Gaius

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Latin[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

For Gāvius, from Proto-Indo-European *geh₂w- (to rejoice). Cognate with gaudeō, gaudium. Cognate with Etruscan 𐌂𐌀𐌄 (cae).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Gāius m (genitive Gāiī or Gāī, feminine Gāia); second declension

  1. A masculine praenomen, in particular:
    • Qui totus servatus est in Gaiorum et Quintorum laterculis.source
      Which was kept in its entirety on the registers of Gaiuses and Quintuses.
    1. Gaius (an eminent jurist who lived in the second century A.D.)
    2. Caligula, the emperor Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus

Usage notes[edit]

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative Gāius Gāī
Genitive Gāiī
Gāī1
Gāiōrum
Dative Gāiō Gāīs
Accusative Gāium Gāiōs
Ablative Gāiō Gāīs
Vocative Gāī Gāī

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).
The noun Gāius possesses several irregularly syncopated forms in the nominative, dative, ablative, and vocative plural.

Derived terms[edit]

  • Gāia f (praenomen)
  • Gāiānus (of, pertaining to Caligula, adjective)
  • Gāīpor (male slave of Gaius)

Descendants[edit]

  • Ancient Greek: Γάϊος (Gáïos)
  • Coptic: ⲅⲁⲓⲟⲥ (gaios)
  • Etruscan: 𐌂𐌀𐌉𐌄 (caie)
  • Italian: Caio
  • Portuguese: Gaio, Caio
  • Russian: Гай (Gaj) (possibly)
  • Spanish: Gayo

References[edit]

  • Gaius in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Gaius in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette