Woden

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See also: woden

English[edit]

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 Wōden on Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Old English Wōden, from Proto-Germanic *Wōdanaz. Doublet of Odin.

Proper noun[edit]

Woden

  1. The Germanic chief god, distributor of talents and god of wisdom and war; Odin, especially in his Anglo-Saxon form.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *Wōdanaz. Cognate with Old Saxon Wōdan, Old High German Wuotan, Old Norse Óðinn. Doublet of Ōþen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Wōden m

  1. Woden
    • 10th century, Codex Exoniensis 341, 28:
      Wōden worhte wēos, wuldor alwalda rūme roderas
      Woden made idols, the Almighty made glory and the vast skies
    • c. 900, translation of Bede's Ecclesiastical History
      Henġest and Horsa wǣron Wihtġīlses suna, þæs fæder wæs Witta hāten, þæs fæder wæs Wihta hāten, þæs fæder wæs Wōden nemned, of þæs strīende maniġra mǣġða cyningcynn fruman lǣdde.
      Hengest and Horsa were the sons of Wihtgyls, whose father was named Witta, whose father was named Wihta, whose father was named Woden, from whose lineage the royal families of many nations originated.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: Woden
  • English: Woden

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *Wōdanaz.

Proper noun[edit]

Woden

  1. Odin
    • 9th century, Old Saxon Baptismal Vow, line 3:
      thunaer ende uuoden ende saxnote
      Thunaer and Woden and Saxnot

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. "woden" in Köbler, Gerhard, Altsächsisches Wörterbuch (5th edition 2014)
  2. "wodenesdach" in Köbler, Gerhard, Mittelniederdeutsches Wörterbuch (3rd edition 2014)