assimilationist

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

assimilation +‎ -ist

Noun[edit]

assimilationist (plural assimilationists)

  1. (sociology) An advocate of the policy or practice of the assimilation of immigrant or other minority cultures into a mainstream culture.
    Spanish-language education is not favored by assimilationist parents of Latino children in the US.
    • 1998, Norman Linzer, David J. Schnall, Jerome A. Chanes, A Portrait of the American Jewish Community, page xii,
      To the assimilationists, American Jews have not merely acculturated — they have assimilated.
    • 1999, Christian Joppke, Immigration and the Nation-State: The United States, Germany, and Great Britain[1], page 147:
      The conflict between melting-pot assimilationists and cultural pluralists betrays a fundamental uncertainty about the meaning of American nationhood, and about the role ethnicity plays in it.
    • 2000, Bruce F. Pauley, From Prejudice to Persecution: A History of Austrian Anti-Semitism[2], page 224:
      The one area where there was at least some agreement between assimilationists and Zionists was Palestine.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

assimilationist (comparative more assimilationist, superlative most assimilationist)

  1. (sociology) Of or pertaining to assimilationism or assimilationists; that promotes or advocates assimilationism.
    • 2000, Katherine Palmer Kaup, Creating the Zhuang: Ethnic Politics in China[3], page 62:
      Shortly after Chiang Kaishek came to power, however, the GMD[Guomindang] once again withdrew its support for self-determination and pursued a more assimilationist strategy.
    • 2011, Peter Scholten, Framing Immigrant Integration: Dutch Research-Policy Dialogues in Comparative Perspective[4], page 187:
      SCP[Social and Cultural Planning Office of the Netherlands] was also more explicitly involved in advocating a more assimilationist approach in this period.
    • 2015, Michael Goebel, Anti-Imperial Metropolis: Interwar Paris and the Seeds of Third World Nationalism[5], page 224:
      To an extent, reformers – such as the Vietnamese and Tunisian constitutionalists or the Antilleans and Malagasies of the LFADCIM[French League for the Attainment of the Rights of Citizens of the Natives of Madagascar] – were more assimilationist than radicals in the sense that they demanded an extension of French citizenship rights and of naturalization.

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