bothe

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See also: Bothe and boþe

English[edit]

Determiner[edit]

bothe

  1. Obsolete spelling of both

Conjunction[edit]

bothe

  1. Obsolete spelling of both

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse búð.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈboːθ/, /ˈboːð/, /ˈbuːθ/

Noun[edit]

bothe (plural boothes)

  1. A store, kiosk or booth, especially a temporary one.
  2. A shack or cabin; any makeshift habitation.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: booth
    • Bengali: বুথ (buth)
    • Scottish Gaelic: bùth
  • Scots: buith, buth
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English bā þā; influenced by Old Norse báðir.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

bothe

  1. both; both of (each or both of two things or groups of things)
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[1], published c. 1410, Matheu 10:28, page 4v; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      and nyle ȝe dꝛede hem þat moun ſle þe bodi .· foꝛ þei moun not ſle þe ſoule / but raþere dꝛede ȝe hym þat mai leeſe boþe bodi and ſoule in to helle
      But don't fear those who can kill the body, because they can't kill the soul. Instead, fear the one who can destroy both the body and soul in Hell.
  2. one of two; either of.
Descendants[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

bothe

  1. both (each or both of two things or groups of things)
Descendants[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

bothe

  1. both; including both or all (things)
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]