clag

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clag ‎(uncountable)

  1. A glue or paste made from starch.
  2. Low cloud, fog or smog.
    • 1993: Harry Furniss, Memoirs - One: The Flying Game
      The sky was thick with dirty gray clag
    • 2001: Colin Castle, Lucky Alex: The Career of Group Captain A.M. Jardine Afc, CD, Seaman and Airman
      This programme included practice interceptions, simulator training, day flying, night flying, clag flying -- in addition to... [a footnote states that clag flying was Air Force slang for foul weather flying.]
    • 2004: David A Barr, One Lucky Canuck: An Autobiography
      We went along in the clag for what seemed like an eternity [a footnote defines clag as low cloud cover]
  3. (Railway slang) Unburned carbon (smoke) from a steam or diesel locomotive, or multiple unit.
    • He put the throttle on full and the loco clagged.
  4. (Motor Racing slang) Bits of rubber which are shed from tires during a race and collect off the racing line, especially on the outside of corners.
    • He ran wide in the corner, hit the clag and spun off.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

clag ‎(third-person singular simple present clags, present participle clagging, simple past and past participle clagged)

  1. (obsolete) To encumber
    • c1620:Thomas Heywood, Thomas Heywood's Art of Love: The First Complete English Translation of Ovid's Ars Amatoria
      As when the orchard boughes are clag'd with fruite
    • 1725: Edward Taylor, Preparatory Meditations
      Can such draw to me/My stund affections all with Cinders clag'd
  2. To stick, like boots in mud
    • 1999: "A queen of a Santee kitchen, pre-war", quoted by Mary Alston Read Simms in the Introduction to Rice Planter and Sportsman: The Recollections of J. Motte Alston, 1821-1909
      Wash the rice well in two waters, if you don't wash 'em, 'e will clag [clag means get sticky] and put 'em in a pot of well-salted boiling water.

Anagrams[edit]


Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cloc, from Proto-Indo-European *kleg-(to cry, sound).

Noun[edit]

clag m ‎(genitive singular cluig, plural cluig)

  1. bell

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
clag chlag glag
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cloc, from Proto-Indo-European *kleg-(to cry, sound).

Noun[edit]

clag m ‎(genitive singular cluig, plural cluig)

  1. bell

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
clag chlag
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.