cnoc

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cnocc,[1] from Proto-Celtic *knukkos (hill). Distantly cognate with English neck. Compare Breton krec'h.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cnoc m (genitive singular cnoic, nominative plural cnoic)

  1. hill, mount
    Is glas na cnoic i bhfad uainn. (proverb)
    Distant prospects can be deceptively alluring.
    (literally, “Hills far from us are green.”)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Yola: knaugh, knough, knock

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cnoc chnoc gcnoc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “cnocc”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  2. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 20
  3. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 71
  4. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 12

Further reading[edit]

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cnocc, from Proto-Celtic *knukkos (hill).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cnoc m (genitive singular cnuic, plural cnuic)

  1. hill, hillock, knoll, eminence
    Cha rachainn gu cùl cnuic leis aig meadhon latha.I would not go with him behind a hill at mid-day.
    An latha bhatar a' roinn na céille, cha robh mi fhéin air a' chnoc.The day that sense was apportioned, I myself was not on the hillock.
  2. heel kibe
  3. council, court
  4. wisdom

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
cnoc chnoc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “cnoc”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “cnocc”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English knock.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cnoc m or f (plural cnociau)

  1. knock

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cnoc gnoc nghnoc chnoc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “cnoc”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies