contentus

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Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Perfect passive participle of contendō (I stretch, strain, tense, make taut).

Participle[edit]

contentus m (feminine contenta, neuter contentum); first/second declension

  1. satisfied stretched, strained, tense, tight, on the stretch
  2. (figuratively) eager, intent

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Perfect passive participle of contineō (I hold together, contain).

Participle[edit]

contentus m (feminine contenta, neuter contentum); first/second declension

  1. having been held together, contained
  2. (places) having been enclosed, bounded, limited

Inflection[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative contentus contenta contentum contentī contentae contenta
genitive contentī contentae contentī contentōrum contentārum contentōrum
dative contentō contentō contentīs
accusative contentum contentam contentum contentōs contentās contenta
ablative contentō contentā contentō contentīs
vocative contente contenta contentum contentī contentae contenta

Adjective[edit]

contentus (feminine contenta, neuter contentum); first/second declension

  1. content, satisfied

Inflection[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative contentus contenta contentum contentī contentae contenta
genitive contentī contentae contentī contentōrum contentārum contentōrum
dative contentō contentō contentīs
accusative contentum contentam contentum contentōs contentās contenta
ablative contentō contentā contentō contentīs
vocative contente contenta contentum contentī contentae contenta

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • contentus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • contentus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “contentus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • contentus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to be contented: rebus suis, sorte sua contentum esse
    • (ambiguous) to be satisfied with a little: paucis, parvo contentum esse
    • (ambiguous) to be content with 12 per cent at compound interest: centesimis cum anatocismo contentum esse (Att. 5. 21. 12)