decrepit

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English

[edit]

Alternative forms

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

From Middle English decrepyt (ante 1439), from Middle French décrépit, from Latin decrepitus (very old), from crepare (to creak).

Pronunciation

[edit]
  • IPA(key): /dɪˈkɹɛp.ɪt/, /dəˈkɹɛp.ɪd/
  • Audio (Southern England):(file)

Adjective

[edit]

decrepit (comparative more decrepit, superlative most decrepit)

  1. Weakened or worn out from age or wear.
    • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], Francesca Carrara. [], volume II, London: Richard Bentley, [], (successor to Henry Colburn), →OCLC, pages 79–80:
      Sorrow is subdued by strong necessity; there is no cause why life should be lengthened for our love; and we feel that the worn and the decrepit do but go down into that grave which had received youth, health, beauty,—all that made existence precious—long before.
    • 2021 December 15, Robin Leleux, “Awards honour the best restoration projects: The Network Rail Community Award: Saltash and Stow”, in RAIL, number 946, page 58:
      Two entrants shared this award for their work on two quite different stations, but with the same purpose of bringing a redundant station building back into use for the benefit of the community, with the added result of conserving an historic building. Saltash Town Council bought Saltash station building after it had become very decrepit and 'an eyesore' - such that it was nearly pulled down to make way for housing.

Synonyms

[edit]

Derived terms

[edit]
[edit]

Translations

[edit]

Further reading

[edit]
  • decrepit”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.

Anagrams

[edit]

Romanian

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

Borrowed from French décrépit, from Latin decrepitus.

Adjective

[edit]

decrepit m or n (feminine singular decrepită, masculine plural decrepiți, feminine and neuter plural decrepite)

  1. decrepit

Declension

[edit]