delicatus

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From dēliciae, from dēliciō, from + laciō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dēlicātus (feminine dēlicāta, neuter dēlicātum); first/second declension

  1. alluring, charming, delightful; voluptuous
  2. soft, tender, delicate
  3. effeminate, spoilt with indulgence
  4. fastidious, scrupulous
  5. (of a person) overly-luxurious, spoiled

Inflection[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative dēlicātus dēlicāta dēlicātum dēlicātī dēlicātae dēlicāta
genitive dēlicātī dēlicātae dēlicātī dēlicātōrum dēlicātārum dēlicātōrum
dative dēlicātō dēlicātō dēlicātīs
accusative dēlicātum dēlicātam dēlicātum dēlicātōs dēlicātās dēlicāta
ablative dēlicātō dēlicātā dēlicātō dēlicātīs
vocative dēlicāte dēlicāta dēlicātum dēlicātī dēlicātae dēlicāta

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • delicatus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • delicatus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “delicatus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • delicatus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • delicacies: cibus delicatus
    • to live a luxurious and effeminate life: delicate ac molliter vivere