dialectic

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dialectique, from Late Latin dialectica, from Ancient Greek διαλεκτική ‎(dialektikḗ, the art of argument through interactive questioning and answering), from διαλεκτικός ‎(dialektikós, competent debater), from διαλέγομαι ‎(dialégomai, to participate in a dialogue), from διά ‎(diá, through, across) + λέγειν ‎(légein, to speak).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌdaɪəˈlɛktɪk/

Noun[edit]

dialectic ‎(plural dialectics)

  1. Any formal system of reasoning that arrives at a truth by the exchange of logical arguments.
  2. A contradiction of ideas that serves as the determining factor in their interaction.
    This situation created the inner dialectic of American history.

Related terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dialectic ‎(comparative more dialectic, superlative most dialectic)

  1. dialectical