discursive

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French discursif, formed from the stem of Latin discursus and the suffix -if, and in part borrowed from Medieval Latin discursivus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

discursive (comparative more discursive, superlative most discursive)

  1. (of speech or writing) Tending to digress from the main point; rambling.
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page viii:
      This means, at times, long and perhaps overly discursive discussions of other taxa.
  2. (philosophy) Using reason and argument rather than intuition.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

discursive

  1. feminine singular of discursif

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

discursīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of discursīvus