disparadised

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English[edit]

Aureliano Milani, Expulsión de Adán y Eva del Paraíso (Expulsion of Adam and Eve from Paradise, first half of the 18th century)

Etymology[edit]

dis- +‎ paradise +‎ -ed.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɪsˈpærədaɪst/
  • Hyphenation: dis‧pa‧ra‧dised

Adjective[edit]

disparadised ‎(not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Removed from paradise.
    • 1969, Allison Ensor, Mark Twain and the Bible, Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky, published 2015, ISBN 978-0-8131-6263-8, page 42:
      [Mark] Twain once wrote of the similarity between himself and Adam disparadised. Jenny Stevens Boardman, the daughter of the old Hannibal jeweler, had reminisced to him about the old days in their town, and to her he replied: "You have spirited me back to a vanished world and the companionship of phantoms ... in thinking of it, dreaming over it, I have seemed like some banished Adam who is revisiting his half-forgotten Paradise and wondering how the arid outside would could ever have seemed green and fair to him."
    • 2001, Scott Lynch-Giddings, A Fancyfull Historie of that Most Notable & Fameous Outlaw Robyn Hood, San Jose, Calif.: Writers Club Press, ISBN 978-0-595-18078-3, page 108:
      Now everything I had or sought, I've lost; / Upon a glimpse, I am disparadised [footnote: fallen from grace and happiness]. / So: go defiant to the nether world, / And darreign Lucifer's dread minions to / Worse torment than thou wouldst do thyself.
    • 2004, Victor J. Lams, Newman's Anglican Georgic: Parochial Sermons, New York, N.Y.: Peter Lang Publishing, ISBN 978-0-8204-7092-4, page 15:
      [John] Milton put his finger on that all-important transposition when the archangel promises the disparadised Adam and Eve that, the Fall notwithstanding, they can yet possess "A paradise within [them], happier farr" (P[aradise] L[ost] XII, line 587).

Verb[edit]

disparadised

  1. simple past tense and past participle of disparadise.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.