dotuit

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Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

to- +‎ Proto-Celtic *tudo-, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tewd- (to push, hit); cognate with Sanskrit तुदति (tudáti), Latin tundō, Gothic 𐍃𐍄𐌰𐌿𐍄𐌰𐌽 (stautan).[1] The final consonant originated in the prototonic ·tuit /ˈtutʲ/ from */ˈtoθuðθʲ/, syncopated from *to-tudeti, and later spread to the deuterotonic. The /u/ vowel, on the other hand, originated in the deuterotonic and later spread to the prototonic, as the original prototonic form */ˈtoθuðθʲ/ would normally have become *·túait */ˈtuːa̯tʲ/.[2]

The preterite stem is from to- + Proto-Celtic *kera- (to fall), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂- (to break); cognate with Sanskrit शृणाति (śṛṇā́ti, to cursh) and Ancient Greek κεραΐζω (keraḯzō, to ravage, plunder).[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

do·tuit (prototonic ·tuit, verbal noun tothaimm)

  1. to fall (move to a lower position under the effect of gravity; come down or descend)

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*tudo-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-17336-1, page 393
  2. ^ Stüber, Karin (1998) The Historical Morphology of n-stems in Celtic (Maynooth Studies in Celtic Linguistics; III), Maynooth: The Department of Old Irish, National University of Ireland, ISBN 0-901519-54-5, pages 76–77
  3. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*kerV-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-17336-1, page 202
  • 1 do·tuit” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.