e. g.

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Adverb[edit]

e. g.

  1. Alternative form of e.g.
    • 1889 July 18, The Nation; quoted in “Dr. Leidy’s Anatomy”, in The University Medical Magazine, volume II, number 1, Philadelphia, Penn.: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1889, page 45:
      Stated in technical linguistic terms, in this treatise pœcilonymy is avoided; e. g., instead of tænia hippocampi in one place, corpus fimbriatum in another, and fimbria in a third, the last is consistently employed and the others given as synonyms.
    • 1913, J[ohn] W[illiam] H[enry] Eyre, “Schizomycetes”, in The Elements of Bacteriological Technique: A Laboratory Guide for Medical, Dental, and Technical Students, second edition, Philadelphia, Penn.; London: W. B. Saunders Company, section “Anatomy”, pages 134–135:
      Stained bacilli, when examined with the polarising microscope, often show a doubly refractile cell wall (e. g., B. tuberculosis and B. anthracis).
    • 1921, H. L. Mencken, “Processes of Word-Formation”, in The American Language: An Inquiry into the Development of English in the United States, second edition, New York, N.Y.: Alfred A. Knopf, chapter VI, “Tendencies in American”, page 185:
      Ad for advertisement is struggling hard for general recognition; some of its compounds, e. g., ad-writer, want-ad, display-ad, ad-card, ad-rate, column-ad and ad-man, are already accepted in technical terminology.
    • 1963, V[asudeva] S[harana] Agrawala, “Social Life”, in India as Known to Pāṇini: A Study of the Cultural Material in the Ashṭādhyāyī, second edition, Varanasi: Prithvi Kumar, Prithivi Prakashan, section 3, “Marriage”, subsection “Social Effect of Marriage”, page 88:
      The social status of the husband devolved on his wife, as implied in Pāṇini’s sūtra (Puṁyogād ākhyāyām, IV. 1. 48), i. e. a designation derived from her husband; e. g. mahāmātrī (ministrix), wife of a mahāmātra, a high government official, and gaṇakī, wife of a gaṇaka (accountant).

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

e. g.

  1. exemplī grātiā (for example)

Synonyms[edit]