eterno

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See also: eternò and Eterno

Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eterno (accusative singular eternon, plural eternoj, accusative plural eternojn)

  1. eternity
    Synonym: eterneco

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin aeternus.

Adjective[edit]

eterno m (feminine singular eterna, masculine plural eternos, feminine plural eternas)

  1. eternal

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /eˈtɛr.no/, [eˈt̪ɛr̺n̺o]
  • Rhymes: -ɛrno
  • Hyphenation: e‧tèr‧no

Etymology 1[edit]

First attested 14th century. From Latin aeternus, from an earlier form aeviternus, derived from aevum (time; age).[1]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

eterno (feminine singular eterna, masculine plural eterni, feminine plural eterne)

  1. eternal, everlasting
    Synonym: eternale (archaic, poetic)
    • 1343, Giovanni Boccaccio, Amorosa visione[1], published 1833, Chapter 2, page 11:
      Il corto termine della vita posto ¶ Non è da consumare in quelle cose, ¶ che ’l bene eterno ci fanno nascosto.
      The short limit set to life is not to be consumed in those things which make the eternal goodness hidden from us.
    • 1516, Ludovico Ariosto, Orlando Furioso [Raging Roland]‎[2], Venice: Printed by Gabriel Giolito, published 1551, Canto 42, page 195:
      Piena d’un foco eterno è quella mazza, ¶ Che ſenza conſumarſi ogn’hora auampa; ¶ Ne per buon ſcudo o tempra di corazza ¶ O per groſſezza d’elmo ſe ne ſcampa.
      That mace is filled with an eternal fire, always burning without ever dying out; and no good shield, or tempered armour, or thick helm is enough to escape it.
    • 1530, Pietro Bembo, “Libro I, Capitolo III”, in Gli asolani, published 1989:
      Infin quel dì, che pria la punse Amore, ¶ Andromeda ebbe sempre affanno e noia; ¶ Poi ch’a Perseo si diè, diletto e gioia ¶ Seguilla viva, e morta eterno onore.
      Until that day, before she was stung by Love, Andromeda was always bothered and bored; after she gave herself to Perseus, she was followed by delight and joy in life, and eternal honour in death.
    • 1799, Vittorio Alfieri, “Proemio”, in Misogallo [The French-Hater]‎[3], London, lines 1–4, page 51:
      Odio all’emula Roma acerbo eterno ¶ Giurava il forte Annibale su l’ara: ¶ Nè a vuoto usciva la minaccia amara, ¶ Che gli era anzi di Gloria eccelso perno.
      Harsh, eternal hatred to the rival Rome swore Hannibal the strong upon the altar; and the bitter threat was not in vain, but instead was paramount crux of glory to him.
    • 1803, Ugo Foscolo, “Alla sera [To the Evening]”, in Sonetti [Sonnets]‎[4], collected in Opere scelte di Ugo Foscolo, vol. 2, Florence, published 1835, page 116:
      Vagar mi fai co’ miei pensier su l’orme ¶ Che vanno al nulla eterno; e intanto fugge ¶ Questo reo tempo, e van con lui le torme ¶ Delle cure, onde meco egli si strugge
      You make me wander with my thoughts, on footprints leading to eternal nothingness; meanwhile, this guilty time passes, and with him the crowds of worries that make him struggle along with me

Noun[edit]

eterno m (uncountable)

  1. eternity
    • 1835, Giacomo Leopardi, “XII. L'infinito [12. The Infinite]”, in Canti[5], Bari: Einaudi, published 1917, lines 8–11, page 49:
      [] E come il vento ¶ odo stormir tra queste piante, io quello ¶ infinito silenzio a questa voce ¶ vo comparando: e mi sovvien l’eterno
      And, as I hear the wind blowing through these plants, I compare that infinite silence to this voice, and I think of eternity
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

eterno

  1. first-person singular present indicative of eternare

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  • eterno in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin aeternus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eyu- (vital energy).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

eterno m (feminine singular eterna, masculine plural eternos, feminine plural eternas, comparable)

  1. eternal

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin aeternus.

Adjective[edit]

eterno (feminine singular eterna, masculine plural eternos, feminine plural eternas)

  1. eternal

Related terms[edit]