excursus

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin excursus(excursion).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

excursus (plural excursuses or excursus)

  1. A fuller treatment (in a separate section) of a particular part of the text of a book, especially a classic.
  2. A narrative digression, especially to discuss a particular issue.
    • 1979, Kyril Bonfiglioli, After You with the Pistol, Penguin 2001, p. 204:
      Here is what us scholars call an excursus. If you are an honest man the following page or two can be of no possible interest to you.
    • 2007, Glen Bowersock, ‘Provocateur’, London Review of Books 29:4, p. 16:
      In his excursus on the Jewish people at the opening of the fifth book of his Histories [...], Tacitus was at a loss to uncover any deep cause for the war that broke out in 66.

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perfect passive participle of excurrō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Participle[edit]

excursus m (feminine excursa, neuter excursum); first/second declension

  1. having run out, run forth, hastened towards
  2. having sallied forth
  3. having projected, extended

Descendants[edit]

Noun[edit]

excursus m (genitive excursūs); fourth declension

  1. excursion, sally, raid

Inflection[edit]

Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative excursus excursūs
genitive excursūs excursuum
dative excursuī excursibus
accusative excursum excursūs
ablative excursū excursibus
vocative excursus excursūs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]