hent

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: hënt and Hënt

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • hente (13th–16th centuries)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English henten (also hynten, hinten > English hint), from Old English hentan (to pursue, chase after, seize, arrest, grasp), from Proto-West Germanic *hantijan, from Proto-Germanic *hantijaną (to seize), related to Icelandic henta (to suit, beseem), Old English huntian (to hunt), Old High German hunda (spoils, booty).

Verb[edit]

hent (third-person singular simple present hents, present participle henting, simple past and past participle hent)

  1. (obsolete) To take hold of, to grasp.
    • 1470–1485 (date produced), Thomas Malory, “Capitulum ix”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book V, [London: [] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: David Nutt, [], 1889, OCLC 890162034:
      And in the grekynge of the day Sir Gawayne hente his hors wondyrs for to seke.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. (obsolete) To take away, carry off, apprehend.
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To clear; to go beyond.

Anagrams[edit]


Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *hɨnt, from Proto-Celtic *sentus, from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to head for, go).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hent m (plural hentoù)

  1. way, road, path.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

hent

  1. imperative of hente

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hent

  1. imperative of henta

Old Norse[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hent

  1. strong feminine nominative singular of hentr
  2. strong neuter nominative/accusative singular of hentr
  3. strong neuter nominative/accusative plural of hentr

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old Norse hentr

Adjective[edit]

hent

  1. handy, skilful

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Yola[edit]

Verb[edit]

hent

  1. simple past tense of hend

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 46