homoromantic

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

homo- +‎ romantic

Adjective[edit]

homoromantic ‎(comparative more homoromantic, superlative most homoromantic)

  1. Romantically attracted to those of the same gender.
    • 2009, Jennifer Byrne, "He's Just Not That Into Anyone, Pop Matters, 31 August 2009
      Often, however, asexual people will also identify with a particular sexual orientation, minus the sexual aspect, and may define themselves as heteroromantic, homoromantic, biromantic, transromantic or panromantic.
    • 2012, Kristen Hammond, "Gettin’ down with the sexuality spectrum and where we fit", The Elm, 5 October 2012:
      It does not address other kinds of sexuality such as demisexual (sexual attraction is experienced only when accompanied by a strong emotional attraction), pansexual (attraction across all gender identities and biological sexes. Think “gender blind”), and the romantics (Homoromantic/heteroromantic/aromantic making attraction experienced romantically rather than sexually) among others.
    • 2013, Helena Horton, "What is Asexuality?", York Vision, 21 October 2013
      Thus, you can be asexual and biromantic (romantically attracted to men and women), panromantic (romantically attracted to any gender identity), homoromantic (romantically attracted to members of the same sex), or heteroromantic (romantically attracted to members of the opposite sex). Some aces are asexual and aromantic, meaning they enjoy platonic friendships, but don’t experience romantic attraction.
    • 2015, Alix O'Neill, "What It Feels Like To Be Asexual In A Sex-Obsessed World", Marie Claire, 23 February 2015
      There are different types of ‘aces’, with asexuals being heteroromantic (romantically attracted to the opposite sex); homoromantic (to the same sex); biromantic (to both sexes); panromantic (to both sexes and transsexuals); or aromantic (experiencing little or no romantic attraction to anyone).

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

See also[edit]