jargoneer

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

jargon +‎ -eer

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jargoneer ‎(plural jargoneers)

  1. (rare, sometimes capitalized) A person who uses a great deal of jargon when speaking or writing, especially one who seems to relish such a manner of expression.
    • 1914, Arthur Quiller-Couch, On the Art of Writing, "Interlude: On Jargon":
      ‘How excellent a thing is sleep,’ sighed Sancho Panza; ‘it wraps a man round like a cloak’—an excellent example, by the way, of how to say a thing concretely: a Jargoneer would have said that ‘among the beneficent qualities of sleep its capacity for withdrawing the human consciousness from the contemplation of immediate circumstances may perhaps be accounted not the least remarkable.’ How vile a thing—shall we say?—is the abstract noun!
    • 1955 Oct. 2, Hannah Smith, "The Doctors Who Try Our Patience," Youngstown Vindicator (US), Parade section, p. 8 (retrieved 20 Nov 2012):
      A friend of mine had a slight skin rash she couldn't identify, so she went to a real Jargoneer. He scowled at the rash, went "Hmmm" several times, then made a couple of sorties into his lab. . . . Finally he came back and informed her impressively that she was suffering from an Indeterminate Dermatitis.
    • 1983 Jan. 9, Grace Glueck, "Gallery View: Philadelphia," New York TImes (retrieved 20 Nov 2012):
      Miss Marincola, a Barthes-Benjamin devotee too, and a relentless jargoneer, also clues us into the fact that the "esthetic vocabulary" of the photographer was developed by the "mass media ‘image’ in its various permutations as a paradigm of reality."
    • 2003 Nov. 21, Tim Homfray, "What do they mean...," Times Educational Supplement (UK) (retrieved 20 Nov 2012):
      Partnering, along with its less irritating cousin "partnership", crops up all over the place, being equally useful to the lazy jargoneer and the lazy policy-maker. It has been said that there is no noun which cannot be verbed; in the same way, there is now nothing, concrete or abstract, which cannot be partnered.

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