relish

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Alteration of reles (scent, taste, aftertaste), from Old French relais, reles (something remaining, that which is left behind), from relaisser (to leave behind).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛ.lɪʃ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

relish (countable and uncountable, plural relishes)

  1. A pleasant taste
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 12.
      A Laplander or Negro has no notion of the relish of wine.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book IX”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Much pleasure we have lost while we abstained / From this delightful fruit, nor known till now / True relish, tasting.
  2. enjoyment; pleasure.
  3. A quality or characteristic tinge.
    • 1717, Alexander Pope, Discourse on Pastoral Poetry:
      It preserves some relish of old writing.
  4. (followed by "for") A taste (for); liking (of); fondness.
    • 1849, Thomas Macaulay, History of England, Chapter 11:
      One of the first acts which he was under the necessity of performing must have been painful to a man of so generous a nature, and of so keen a relish for whatever was excellent in arts and letters.
    • 1785, William Cowper, letter to the Rev. John Newton (dated December 10, 1785)
      I have a relish for moderate praise, because it bids fair to be judicious.
    • 2019 July 17, Talia Lavin, “When Non-Jews Wield Anti-Semitism as Political Shield”, in GQ[1]:
      Jews and Israel are not synonymous; nor is support for Palestine synonymous with anti-Semitism; nor is questioning the orthodoxy of the Republican party, which the majority of us do with relish, an insult to Jewry.
  5. A cooked or pickled sauce, usually made with vegetables or fruits, generally used as a condiment.
    • 1994 July 21, Faye Fiore, “Congress relishes another franking privilege: Meat lobby puts on the dog with exclusive luncheon for lawmakers – experts on pork”, in Los Angeles Times[2]:
      Congressmen gleefully wolfed down every imaginable version of the hot dog – smoked kielbasas, jumbo grillers, Big & Juicy's, kosher dogs and spiced dogs – topped with every imaginable condiment – hot mustard, sweet mustard, jalapenos, spaghetti sauce, regular relish, corn relish, maple syrup salsa and the secret sauce of Rep. Jack Kingston (R-Ga.). ("If I told you the recipe," an aide explained, "I'd have to shoot you.")
  6. In a wooden frame, the projection or shoulder at the side of, or around, a tenon, on a tenoned piece.
  7. Something that is greatly liked or savoured.

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

relish (third-person singular simple present relishes, present participle relishing, simple past and past participle relished)

  1. (transitive) To taste or eat with pleasure, to like the flavor of [from 16th c.]
  2. (transitive) to take great pleasure in.
    He relishes their time together.
    I don't relish the idea of going out tonight.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To taste; to have a specified taste or flavour. [16th-19th c.]
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition II, section 3, member 3:
      honourable enterprises are accompanied with dangers and damages, as experience evinceth; they will make the rest of thy life relish the better.
    • c. 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The VVinters Tale”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene ii]:
      Had I been the finder-out of this secret, it would not have relish'd among my other discredits.
    • 1695, John Woodward, An essay toward a natural history of the earth
      A theory, which, how much soever it may relish of wit and invention, hath no foundation in nature.
  4. (transitive) To give a taste to; to cause to taste nice, to make appetizing. [from 16th c.]
  5. (obsolete, intransitive) To give pleasure.

Synonyms[edit]

(take pleasure in): : appreciate, delight in, enjoy, like, revel in

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English relish.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

relish f (uncountable)

  1. relish (pickled sauce)