relish

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Alteration of reles (scent, taste, aftertaste), from Old French relais, reles (something remaining, that which is left behind), from relaisser (to leave behind).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

relish (countable and uncountable, plural relishes)

  1. A pleasing taste; flavor that gratifies the palate; hence, enjoyable quality; power of pleasing.
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 12.
      A Laplander or Negro has no notion of the relish of wine.
    • Milton
      Much pleasure we have lost while we abstained / From this delightful fruit, nor known till now / True relish, tasting.
    • Addison
      When liberty is gone, / Life grows insipid, and has lost its relish.
  2. Savor; quality; characteristic tinge.
    • Alexander Pope
      It preserves some relish of old writing.
  3. A taste for; liking; appetite; fondness.
    • Macaulay
      a relish for whatever was excellent in arts
    • Cowper
      I have a relish for moderate praise, because it bids fair to be judicious.
  4. A cooked or pickled sauce, usually made with vegetables or fruits, generally used as a condiment.
    • 1994 July 21, Faye Fiore, “Congress relishes another franking privilege: Meat lobby puts on the dog with exclusive luncheon for lawmakers – experts on pork”, in Los Angeles Times[1]:
      Congressmen gleefully wolfed down every imaginable version of the hot dog – smoked kielbasas, jumbo grillers, Big & Juicy's, kosher dogs and spiced dogs – topped with every imaginable condiment – hot mustard, sweet mustard, jalapenos, spaghetti sauce, regular relish, corn relish, maple syrup salsa and the secret sauce of Rep. Jack Kingston (R-Ga.). ("If I told you the recipe," an aide explained, "I'd have to shoot you.")
  5. In a wooden frame, the projection or shoulder at the side of, or around, a tenon, on a tenoned piece.
  6. Something that is greatly liked or savoured.

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

relish (third-person singular simple present relishes, present participle relishing, simple past and past participle relished)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To taste; to have a specified taste or flavour. [16th-19th c.]
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, (please specify |partition=1, 2, or 3):
      , II.3.3:
      honourable enterprises are accompanied with dangers and damages, as experience evinceth; they will make the rest of thy life relish the better.
    • Shakespeare
      Had I been the finder-out of this secret, it would not have relished among my other discredits.
    • Woodward
      A theory, which, how much soever it may relish of wit and invention, hath no foundation in nature.
  2. (transitive) To give a relish to; to cause to taste agreeable, to make appetizing. [from 16th c.]
    • Dryden
      a sav'ry bit that served to relish wine
  3. (transitive) To taste or eat with pleasure, to like the flavor of [from 16th c.]
  4. (transitive) to take great pleasure in.
    He relishes their time together.
    • Shakespeare
      Now I begin to relish thy advice.
    • Atterbury
      He knows how to prize his advantages, and to relish the honours which he enjoys.
  5. (transitive) to look forward to
    I don't relish the idea of going out tonight.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for relish in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English relish.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

relish f (uncountable)

  1. relish (pickled sauce)