khachapuri

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

An Adjaran khachapuri, filled with cheese and topped with a raw egg

Borrowing from Georgian ხაჭაპური (xač̣aṗuri), possibly from ხაჭო (xač̣o, curds) or ხაჭა (xač̣a, name of the Georgian baker who invented the dish) + პური (ṗuri, bread) (from Old Georgian [Term?], from Ancient Greek πυρός (purós, wheat), from Proto-Indo-European *puHr- (wheat)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

khachapuri (plural khachapuris)

  1. A cheese pastry from the country of Georgia in the Caucasus region of Eurasia.
    • 1977, The New Review, volume 4, London: New Review Ltd., ISSN 0305-8344, OCLC 750489171, page 30:
      On the breakfast table I can see the remains of: sturgeon, caviare (pink and black), blinies, cottage cheese and two other cheeses, buckwheat, hatchapuri—a bread cheese—and sour cream, hashi (stew), radishes and spring onions []
    • 1983, Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, volume 7, New York, N.Y.: Davis Publications, ISSN 0162-2188, OCLC 4066884, page 128:
      After Varadzia had served Svobodova with sturgeon and the local delicacy, a hatchapuri—a sort of paratha stuffed with cheese—washed down with a glass of the Lomnja red wine, he sat down and took a pipe with the stranger.
    • 1993, Darra Goldstein, “Breads and Grains”, in The Georgian Feast: The Vibrant Culture and Savory Food of the Republic of Georgia, New York, N.Y.: HarperCollins, ISBN 978-0-06-016646-5; reprinted Berkeley; Los Angeles, Calif.: University of California Press, 1999, ISBN 978-0-520-21929-8, page 136:
      No feast would seem proper without the marvelous cheese bread, khachapuri. Khachapuri is found throughout Georgia in many guises—round, rectangular, and boat-shaped. The dough can be yeasty with a thick crust, many-layered and flaky, or tender and cakelike. The bread is usually filled with a fresh, slightly sour cheese like imeruli (Imeretian) or suluguni, but salted cheeses like bryndza may also be used, as long as they are soaked first. [] For those desiring extra sustenance, the khachapuri may be topped with a cracked egg and returned to the oven until the egg sizzles. My favorite version of this cholesterol-rich khachapuri is the adzharuli khachapuri or Adzharian cheese bread, found in Batumi on the Black Sea coast and appropriately boat-shaped.
    • 2014, John Shiffman, “‘Very Rich Men’”, in Operation Shakespeare: The True Story of an Elite International Sting, New York, N.Y.: Simon & Schuster, ISBN 978-1-4516-5513-1; trade paperback edition, New York, N.Y.: Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, August 2015, ISBN 978-1-4516-5516-2, page 213:
      At the waiter's suggestion, they added mushroom soup and khachapuri, the traditional and ubiquitous Georgian cheese bread.
    • 2014 February 25, Janice N. Mau, “‘Gamarjoba’, Georgia.’”, in Samovars and Shashlik: Gems of an Overseas Adventure, Bloomington, Ind.: Balboa Press, Hay House, ISBN 978-1-4525-1305-8, page 120:
      Another delicious Georgian dish was Hachapuri. This is a kind of flat bread with soft cheese and butter in the middle, more butter melted all over the top. There are different kinds of Hachapuri, reflecting the different areas, but all of it is absolutely fantastic. People eat it as a matter of course at almost every meal.
    • 2015 October 6, Michael Russell, “Portland’s Kargi Gogo food cart relaunches with new, all-khachapuri menu”, in The Oregonian/OregonLive.com[1], archived from the original on 30 May 2016:
      Kargi Gogo, the downtown food cart devoted to the cuisine of Georgia, reopened last week with a new menu devoted to the country's signature dish, khachapuri, or cheesy bread. The new menu highlights four traditional Georgian khachapuris, including the traditional, a pupusa-liked disc stuffed with sulguni (a farmers cheese), plus one with extra cheese melted on top and another with ham and bacon.

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