lounder

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Scots

Verb[edit]

lounder (third-person singular simple present lounders, present participle loundering, simple past and past participle loundered)

  1. (Britain, dialectal, chiefly Northern England, archaic) To beat; to deal a heavy blow; to whack
    • 1821, Sir Walter Scott, Tales of my Landlord: Old Mortality:
      "But Father," said Jenny, "if they come to lounder ilk ither as they did last time, suld na I cry on you?”
    • 1893, Robert Louis Stevenson, Catriona:
      Why is all this shame loundered on my head?
    • 1835, John Mackay Wilson, Wilson's Historical, Traditionary, and Imaginative Tales:
      And they a' laughed thegither, and I up wi' the belt, and I loundered them round the house and round the house, till one screamed and another screamed, and even their mother got to squeel loudest.

Noun[edit]

lounder (plural lounders)

  1. (Britain, dialectal, chiefly Northern England, archaic) A heavy blow
    • 1822, Ronald M'Chronicle (pseud.), Legends of Scotland:
      Deed, my bonny lass, I'll hae a kiss for a' my trouble at least,' and he caught her by the waist ; but she geed him sic a lounder o' the side o' the heed, that she garr'd him reel again
    • 2009, Popular Tales of the West Highlands, →ISBN:
      When he rose the third time, she struck him a lounder of the stick; the stick stuck to the dead man, and the hand stuck to the stick; and out they were.
    • 1827, William Tennant, Papistry storm'd: or, The Dingin' down o' the cathedral:
      He gave his lunzie sic a lounder As did the sillie man dumfounder.

Anagrams[edit]