maçon

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See also: macon, Macon, and Mâcon

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French maçon(mason) from Old French maçon, masson, machun(brick-layer), from Late Latin maciō, machiō(carpenter, brick-layer) (attested 7th century by Isidore de Séville), of Germanic origin, from Frankish *makjo(builder, maker), derivative of *makōn(to build, make, work), from Proto-Germanic *makōną(to work, build, make), from Proto-Indo-European *mag-(to knead, mix, make), conflated with Frankish *matjo(cutter), from Proto-Germanic *matją, *mattukaz(ploghshare, mattock), from Proto-Indo-European *mat-(hoe, mattock). Akin to Old High German steinmezzo(stone mason), mahhōn(to make, work). More at make, mattock.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

maçon m (plural maçons)

  1. mason, stonemason; builder
  2. (freemasonry) Mason, Freemason

External links[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • macon (older manuscripts)

Etymology[edit]

Old French maçon.

Noun[edit]

maçon m (plural maçons)

  1. mason; builder

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • macon (manuscript form)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

maçon m (oblique plural maçons, nominative singular maçons, nominative plural maçon)

  1. mason; builder
    • circa 1155, Wace, Le Roman de Brut:
      Maçons fist querre et carpenters
      Si fist refaire les mousters
      He searched for masons and carpenters
      in order to rebuild the minsters.

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

maçon m (plural maçons)

  1. Alternative form of mação