propense

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prōpensus, perfect passive participle of prōpendeō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

propense (comparative more propense, superlative most propense)

  1. (archaic) Leaning toward, in a moral sense; inclined; disposed; prone
    women propense to holiness
    • 1739, David Hume, Treatise of Human Nature Book 3: Of Morals
      The most immediate effects of pleasure and pain are the propense and averse motions of the mind; which are diversified into volition, into desire and aversion, grief and joy, hope and fear
    • 1668, Desiderius Erasmus, translated by John Wilson, The Praise of Folly
      [] women are so earnestly delighted with this kind of men, as being more propense by nature to pleasure and toys.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

propense

  1. feminine plural of propenso

Verb[edit]

propense

  1. feminine plural of propenso

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prōpēnse

  1. vocative masculine singular of prōpēnsus

References[edit]

  • propense in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • propense in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers