propensity

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pɹəˈpɛnsɪti/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

propensity (countable and uncountable, plural propensities)

  1. A tendency, preference, or attraction.
    • 1902, William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience, Lecture I:
      To the psychologist the religious propensities of man must be at least as interesting as any other of the facts pertaining to his mental constitution. It would seem, therefore, that, as a psychologist, the natural thing for me would be to invite you to a descriptive survey of those religious propensities.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193:
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.
    He has a propensity for lengthy discussions of certain favorite topics.

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