prone

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: prôné and prône

English[edit]

prone and supine position

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prōnus (turned forward, bent or inclined).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prone (comparative more prone, superlative most prone)

  1. Lying face downward.
    Synonym: prostrate
    Antonym: supine
    prone position
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter I, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      But they had already discovered that he could be bullied, and they had it their own way; and presently Selwyn lay prone upon the nursery floor, impersonating a ladrone while pleasant shivers chased themselves over Drina, whom he was stalking.
  2. Having a downward inclination or slope.
  3. Shooting from a lying down position.
  4. (figuratively) Predisposed, liable, inclined.
    prone to failure
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, “Sonnet 141”, in Shake-speares Sonnets. Neuer before Imprinted[1], London: By G[eorge] Eld for T[homas] T[horpe] and are to be sold by William Aspley, OCLC 216596634:
      Nor are mine ears with thy tongue's tune delighted; / Nor tender feeling, to base touches prone, / Nor taste, nor smell, desire to be invited / To any sensual feast with thee alone: []
    • 2019 November 20, “Thanathorn: Thai opposition leader disqualified as MP”, in BBC[2], BBC, retrieved 2019-11-21:
      Future Forward came third in the elections with 6.2 million votes, and Mr Thanathorn has since emerged as the main voice of opposition to the military-dominated government. He has been a strong critic of the powerful army's role in coup-prone Thai politics.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prone

  1. feminine plural of prono

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prōne

  1. vocative masculine singular of prōnus

References[edit]