sensate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sensat, from Late Latin sensatus (able to sense), from sensus (sense).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛn.seɪt/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

sensate (comparative more sensate, superlative most sensate)

  1. Perceived by one or more of the senses.
  2. Having the ability to sense things physically.
  3. Felt or apprehended through a sense, or the senses.
    • 1689, Richard Baxter, A treatise of knowledge and love compared in two parts
      To say that Volitions which are acts of the Intellectual Soul must be sensate, and so make a Species on the phantasie, as sensate things do

Verb[edit]

sensate (third-person singular simple present sensates, present participle sensating, simple past and past participle sensated)

  1. (transitive) To feel or apprehend by means of the senses; to perceive.
    to sensate light, or an odour
    • R. Hooke
      As those of the one are sensated by the ear, so those of the other are by the eye.

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sensate

  1. feminine plural of sensato

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From sēnsātus (sensible, intelligent) +‎ .

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sensātē (not comparable)

  1. intelligently, sensibly

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sēnsāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of sēnsātus

References[edit]

  • sensate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette