sleight

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See also: Sleight

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sleight, sleght, sleythe, from Old Norse slœgð (cunning), from Proto-Germanic *slōgiþō, from *slōgiz (cunning) (whence English sly). Doublet of slöjd/sloyd.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sleight (plural sleights)

  1. Cunning; craft; artful practice.
  2. An artful trick; sly artifice; a feat so dexterous that the manner of performance escapes observation.
  3. Dexterous practice; dexterity; skill.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English sliht.

Adjective[edit]

sleight

  1. Alternative form of slight

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse slœgð, from Proto-Germanic *slōgiþō; equivalent to sly +‎ -th.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /slixt/, /slɛi̯xt/, /slɛi̯ð/

Noun[edit]

sleight (plural sleightes)

  1. Wit, shrewdness, judiciousness; the state of being wise.
  2. Adeptness, expertise; knowledge in a certain area.
  3. Tactics, plans, preparation; the act of readying.
  4. A tactic, approach, method, or accomplishment.
  5. Work, labour, might; that which is expended on a task.
  6. Detail; the finer or more intricate points of something.
  7. Cunning, sleight; craft; artful practice.
  8. An artful or deceiving trick; a sly artifice.
  9. (rare) Something of extreme attractiveness.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: sleight
  • Scots: slicht
References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sleight

  1. Judicious, considered, shrewd; having or indicative of great wisdom.
  2. Sly, artful, wily; employing or being an example of deception.
References[edit]