toothful

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

tooth +‎ -ful

Noun[edit]

toothful (plural toothfuls)

  1. (archaic) a small amount, especially a small alcoholic drink
    • 1917, H. C. McNeile, No Man's Land[1]:
      The signal officer was looking wise over something that boomed and buzzed alternately; the machine-gun officer may, or may not, have been enjoying another toothful.
    • 1901, Kate Douglas Wiggin, Penelope's Irish Experiences[2]:
      "Give her a toothful of whisky, your ladyship.
    • 1899, Edward Noyes Westcott, David Harum[3]:
      "Thank you," said David a minute or two later on, holding out the glass while John poured, "jest a wisdom toothful.
    • 1869, Atticus, Our Churches and Chapels[4]:
      Of course it is better late than never, only not much bliss follows late attendance, and hardly a toothful of ecstacy can be obtained in three-quarters of a minute.

Adjective[edit]

toothful (comparative more toothful, superlative most toothful)

  1. (obsolete) toothsome