triticum

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See also: Triticum

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin trīticum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

triticum (countable and uncountable, plural triticums)

  1. A plant of the genus Triticum (wheat and related cereals).
    • 1734, “Of the ſeveral Species of Wheat and and Rye; their Etymology, Character, &c. together with the true Seaſons of Sowing, and Soil proper for each Species”, in The Practical Husbandman and Planter: or, Observations on the Ancient and Modern Husbandry, Planting and Gardening; [], volume II: “Containing July, August and September”, number IV: “for July”, London: [] S. Switzer, [], page 117:
      The Characteriſticks of the Triticums, or Wheat-corns, are, according to Ray, that they are culminiferous, graminifolious Herbs, having an imperfect Flower; which culminiferous Herbs or Plants, are thoſe which have a large Grain, or thoſe which have a ſmall one: All which are annual. [Note:] The Character of the Triticums.
    • 1849, “WHEAT”, in John M. Wilson, editor, The Rural Cyclopedia, or a General Dictionary of Agriculture, and of the Arts, Sciences, Instruments, and Practice, Necessary to the Farmer, Stockfarmer, Gardener, Forester, Landsteward, Farrier, &c., volume IV: “Q–Z”, Edinburgh: A. Fullarton and Co., [], pages 660, column 2; 661, columns 1–2:
      All the present triticums are hardy exotic annuals,—four of them varying in height from 6 to 24 inches, and possessing very little interest, and the rest varying in height from 2+12 to 6 feet, and ranging in value from inferior economical plants cultivable only in their native regions to the richest cereal grasses of all the temperate parts of the civilized world. [] The Romans of the time of the Cæsars were well acquainted with the advantages of classifying wheats into widely different varieties, and of severally using these for the soils and seasons to which they were respectively best adapted; and they seem generally to have arranged them into two great groups under the names of triticum and far, and to have divided each of these into several kinds. See the article Far. “Columella mentions three kinds of triticum. [] He adds, that it is necessary to have all these kinds both of triticum and far, as it seldom happens that a farm is so situated, that one kind is proper for every part of it; there being, almost in every farm, both wet and dry lands. Almost all the rustic writers agree in this, that far is most proper for wet clay land, and triticum for dry land. ‘In wet red clays,’ says Cato, ‘sow far; and in dry, clean, and open lands, sow triticum.’ ‘Therefore,’ says Varro, ‘skilful husbandmen in their wet lands sow far, rather than triticum.’ Columella says, ‘that triticum thrives best on dry land, and that far is less hurt by wetness.’ Though triticum, in general, is represented as best adapted to dry soils, yet that kind of it called siligo is mentioned as proper enough for wet lands. Columella joins it with far, when he says, ‘wet and stiff clays do well enough for siligo and far.’ He observes that siligo is the whitest kind of the triticum, but inferior in weight,—that it answers very well in a wet seed time, and is proper for land over which water is in danger of running; and he adds, that it may be got with very little difficulty, as triticum, when sown upon land that lies low and wet, after the fourth crop, is turned into it. Pliny likewise observes that the siligo is proper for wet lands; and he mentions some soils on which it is turned into triticum.”
    • 1856, The Journal of the Royal Agricultural Society of England, volume the seventeenth, London: John Murray, [], page 174:
      It was for some time considered that wheat belonged to the genus triticum, perhaps from the form of its spike of flowers and the peculiar flavour of its herbage: this latter fact, which becomes apparent upon crushing the leaves of a young wheat plant or leaves of the couch—triticum repens—in a peculiar disagreeable odour, is, doubtless, derivable from the presence of an essential oil, to which we may perhaps attribute the medicinal properties which cause the emetic action on dogs; and this unison of quality in the herbage of wheat and the wild triticums would at least lead to the inference of the affinity of the plants producing it.
    • 1881, Margaret Murray Robertson, “Chapter VII”, in Frederica and Her Guardians: or the Perils of Orphanhood, London: Hodder and Stoughton, [], page 92:
      And strange to say, Eppie, the recluse of the garret, who had not set her foot on a green thing growing beyond the orchard for many a year and day, even she gave eager interest and stimulus to the girl’s pursuit, and with spectacles on nose peered into triticums and anemones brought from the mountain, and into apple blossoms, and even into dandelions and buttercups gathered in the orchard, for want of rarer flowers.
    • 1881, “GRASSES”, in George Ripley, Charles A. Dana, editors, The American Cyclopædia: A Popular Dictionary of General Knowledge, volume VIII: “Glasgow–Hortense”, New York: D. Appleton and Company, [], page 169, column 1:
      Another indefinite name of travellers is “bunch grass,” is given to any kind that forms clumps or tufts; festucas, boutelouas, triticums, and eriocoma all bear this name.—Grasses regarded as Weeds.
    • 2006, Steve Meyerowitz, Wheatgrass: Nature’s Finest Medicine: The Complete Guide to Using Grasses to Revitalize Your Health, seventh edition, Sproutman Publications, →ISBN, pages 34 (“The Pioneers”), 59 (“Research”):
      Dr. Ann has a long list of stories and testimonials from guests who improved their health with the help of wheatgrass. Wheatgrass and its sister triticum barley, have by testimony, helped guests with ailments like high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, gastritis, stomach ulcers, pancreas and liver troubles, asthma, glaucoma, eczema, skin problems, constipation, hemorrhoids, diverticulitis, colitis, fatigue, female problems, arthritis, athlete’s foot, anemia, bad breath/body odor, and burns. [] But barley, wheat, oats, Kamut, and rye are all brother and sister triticums.

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From trītus, perfect passive participle of terō (graze, grind).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trīticum n (genitive trīticī); second declension

  1. wheat, a kind of grain

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative trīticum trītica
Genitive trīticī trīticōrum
Dative trīticō trīticīs
Accusative trīticum trītica
Ablative trīticō trīticīs
Vocative trīticum trītica

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]