venery

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English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English venerie, borrowed from Middle French venerie, from Old French venerie (hunting), derived from vener, from Latin vēnor (I hunt).

Noun[edit]

venery (usually uncountable, plural veneries)

  1. The hunting of wild animals.
    • 1650, Thomas Browne, “A brief enumeration of Authors”, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica: [], 2nd edition, London: [] A. Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath[aniel] Ekins, [], OCLC 152706203, 1st book, page 24:
      There are extant of his in Greek, four books of Cynegeticks or venation, five of Halieuticks or piſcation, commented and publiſhed by Ritterhuſius; wherein deſcribing beaſts of venery and fiſhes []
    • 1963, Thomas Pynchon, V.
      But soon enough he’d wake up the second, real time, to make again the tiresome discovery that it hadn’t really ever stopped being the same simple-minded, literal pursuit; V. ambiguously a beast of venery, chased like the hart, hind or hare, chased like an obsolete, or bizarre, or forbidden form of sexual delight.
  2. Game animals.
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Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English venery, venerie, venerye, borrowed from Medieval Latin veneria, from venus (love).

Noun[edit]

venery (countable and uncountable, plural veneries)

  1. The pursuit of sexual pleasure or indulgence.
    • 1650, Thomas Browne, “Of the Mandrakes of Leah”, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica: [], 2nd edition, London: [] A. Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath[aniel] Ekins, [], OCLC 152706203, 7th book, page 301:
      [] Opium it ſelf is conceived to extimulate unto venery, and for that intent is ſometimes uſed by Turkes, Perſians, and moſt orientall Nations;
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