ôter

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle French and Old French oster, from Latin obstare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ôter

  1. to take away, remove
  2. to take off, remove (clothes etc.)
    • 1829, Victor Hugo, Le Dernier Jour d’un condamné
      Le guichetier de garde vient d’entrer dans mon cachot, il a ôté sa casquette, m’a salué, s’est excusé de me déranger et m’a demandé, en adoucissant de son mieux sa rude voix, ce que je désirais à déjeuner.
      The duty hatchman just came into my cell, took off his cap, gave me a salute, said he was sorry for bothering me and asked me, whispering as best he could with his rough voice, what I wanted for lunch.
  3. to remove, cut (text etc.); to take away (in arithmetic)
  4. to take (something) away from someone; to deprive
  5. (pronominal) to move oneself, get out of the way

Conjugation[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French oster, from Latin obstō, obstāre, from ob (before, in front) + stō, stāre (stand).

Verb[edit]

ôter

  1. to remove

Antonyms[edit]