rote

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See also: Rote and roté

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English, origin uncertain. Likely from the phrase bi (by) rote (heart), c. 1300. Some have proposed a relationship either with Old French rote/rute (route), or Latin rota (wheel) (see rotary), but the OED calls both suggestions groundless.

Noun[edit]

rote (uncountable)

  1. The process of learning or committing something to memory through mechanical repetition, usually by hearing and repeating aloud, often without full attention to comprehension or thought for the meaning.
    They didn’t have copies of the music for everyone, so most of us had to learn the song by rote.
    • 2009, Jim Holt, Got Poetry?
      But memorize them we did, in big painful chunks, by rote repetition.
  2. Mechanical routine; a fixed, habitual, repetitive, or mechanical course of procedure.
    The pastoral scenes from those commercials don’t bear too much resemblance to the rote of daily life on a farm.
Usage notes[edit]
  • Commonly found in the phrase "by rote" and in attributive use: "rote learning", "rote memorization", and so on.
  • Often used pejoratively in comparison with "deeper" learning that leads to "understanding".
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rote (comparative more rote, superlative most rote)

  1. By repetition or practice.
    • 2000, Ami Klin; Fred R. Volkmar, Sara S. Sparrow, Asperger syndrome‎, page 316:
      The former may be seen as a more rote form of learning, contrasting with the latter which appears to include "executive" aspects

Verb[edit]

rote (third-person singular simple present rotes, present participle roting, simple past and past participle roted)

  1. (obsolete) To go out by rotation or succession; to rotate.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Zane Grey to this entry?)
  2. (transitive) To learn or repeat by rote.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Etymology 2[edit]

c. 1600, from Old Norse rót (tossing, pitching (of sea)) n, perhaps related to rauta (to roar).

Noun[edit]

rote (uncountable)

  1. (rare) The roar of the surf; the sound of waves breaking on the shore.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Old English rote, probably of German origin; compare Middle High German rotte, and English crowd (a kind of violin).

Noun[edit]

rote (plural rotes)

  1. A kind of guitar, the notes of which were produced by a small wheel or wheel-like arrangement; an instrument similar to the hurdy-gurdy.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      extracting mistuned dirges from their harps, crowds, and rotes

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

rote

  1. first-person singular present indicative of roter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of roter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of roter
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of roter
  5. second-person singular imperative of roter

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rote

  1. strong feminine singular nominative form of rot.
  2. strong feminine singular accusative form of rot.
  3. strong plural nominative form of rot.
  4. strong plural accusative form of rot.
  5. weak masculine singular nominative form of rot.
  6. weak feminine singular nominative form of rot.
  7. weak feminine singular accusative form of rot.
  8. weak neuter singular nominative form of rot.
  9. weak neuter singular accusative form of rot.
  10. mixed feminine singular nominative form of rot.
  11. mixed feminine singular accusative form of rot.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse róta.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rote (present tense roter; past tense and past participle rota or rotet)

  1. to untidy, to make a mess
  2. (slang) to fool around (engage in casual or flirtatious sexual acts)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

rote

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of rotar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of rotar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of rotar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of rotar.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old Swedish rote, cognate with English rout and Latin rutta, ruptus.

Noun[edit]

rote c

  1. a district (of a parish or town, for the purpose of fire fighting, road maintenance, mail forwarding, social care, etc.)
  2. a file, a section, a squad, a pair (of soldiers, of aircraft)
    20 rotar
    twenty file
    med utryckta rotar
    four deep
    indelning av rotar!
    squad-number!

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]