Indus

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See also: indus and Indus.

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin Indus, from Ancient Greek Ἰνδός (Indós), from Old Persian 𐏃𐎡𐎯𐎢𐏁 (hiⁿduš), from Proto-Iranian *hindu- (compare Avestan 𐬵𐬌𐬧𐬛𐬎 (hiṇdu-)), from Proto-Indo-Iranian *sindʰu- or Sanskrit सिन्धु (síndhu).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Indus

  1. A large river of south-central Asia, rising in Tibet and flowing through Kashmir and Pakistan to the Arabian Sea.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • Hintze, Almut (1998) "The Migrations of the Indo-Iranians and the Iranian Sound-Change s > h." In: Meid, Wolfgang, (ed.), Sprache und Kultur der Indogermanen. Akten der 10.Fachtagung der Indo­germa­nischen Gesell­schaft, Inns­bruck 22.-29.9.1996. Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachwissenschaft, 139-153, 1 map. (Innsbrucker Beiträge zur Sprachwissenschaft, Bd. 93)

Etymology 2[edit]

Named by Dutch explorers Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman between 1595 and 1597. From Latin Indus, "Indian".

Proper noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Indus

  1. (astronomy) A constellation of the southern sky between Grus and Pavo. It commemorates American Indians.
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Etymology 3[edit]

A shortened forn of industry

Proper noun[edit]

Indus

  1. A hamlet in Alberta, Canada

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Indus m

  1. the Indus river

Hungarian[edit]

Hungarian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia hu

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈinduʃ/
  • Hyphenation: In‧dus

Proper noun[edit]

Indus

  1. Indus River

Latin[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Indus m (genitive Indī); second declension

  1. The Indus River.

See also[edit]