Jennifer

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Welsh Gwenhwyfar, from gwen (fair, white), and ghwyf (smooth); the Welsh equivalent of the Irish Fionnbharr, derived from Goidelic fionn (white, fair) and barr (head).

Proper noun[edit]

Jennifer

  1. A female given name.
    • 1906 George Bernard Shaw, The Doctor's Dilemma, Act I:
      RIDGEON. Thats a wonderful drawing. Why is it called Jennifer?
      MRS DUBEDAT. My name is Jennifer.
      RIDGEON. A strange name.
      MRS DUBEDAT. Not in Cornwall. I am Cornish. It's only what you call Guinevere.
    • 1960 Jerrard Tickell, The Hunt for Richard Thorpe, Doubleday, page 10:
      "Most people's sisters have decent names like Jennifer or Jane or something. What did you say hers was?"
    • 2000 Dana Stabenow, Nothing Gold Can Stay, Dutton, ISBN 0525945598, page 131:
      Jennifer. Jenny with the light brown hair. Jenny-fair, their high school French teacher had called her, and fair she had been.

Usage notes[edit]

The name was mostly used in Cornwall before the 20th century. It became popular in all English-speaking countries, first in UK in the 1950s, and then in US as the top name for women born in 1970-1984.

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Jennifer in the 20th century.

Proper noun[edit]

Jennifer

  1. A female given name.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Jennifer in the 20th century.

Proper noun[edit]

Jennifer

  1. A female given name.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Jennifer in the 20th century.

Proper noun[edit]

Jennifer

  1. A female given name.