Talk:girly girl

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girly girl

talk about SoP... -- Liliana 19:30, 28 October 2011 (UTC)

For what it's worth, this is a "set phrase", often used as an opposite for tomboy. Equinox 19:32, 28 October 2011 (UTC)
Though it is a common collocation, probably due to the reduplicative sound of it, "girly bitch", "girly man", "girly lady", "girly woman", "girly boy", "girly rider", etc would all be attestable, as well as many NPs not referring to humans. Consequently, unless it really meant something quite unexpected, it seems not to meet CFI. DCDuring TALK 21:01, 28 October 2011 (UTC)
Keep per WT:COALMINE, as a Google Books search indicates that girlygirl meets the CFI. bd2412 T 20:15, 30 October 2011 (UTC)
Mmmmmmh. kept -- Liliana 15:59, 22 November 2011 (UTC)


RFD (2012)[edit]

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girly girl

This passed RFD in late 2011, when two of the only four editors to comment invoked COALMINE. Recent RFDs, such as that of Chinese man, have shown that some members of the community now interpret COALMINE as not applying to terms with differing stress / intonation, etc. I think a new discussion of this term is therefore in order. I, for one, perceive "girly girl" (girl who is girly) as a different term than "girlygirl". - -sche (discuss) 21:47, 12 June 2012 (UTC)

Replace with {{alternative form of|girlygirl}} No harm in having it, I just don't see the point of having the same information twice. (Mind you, I personally see girly girl and girlygirl as interchangeable - I'd still pronounce "girly girl" as one word, and I wouldn't see it as just the female version of "boyish boy", which is definitely not idiomatic) Smurrayinchester (talk) 08:00, 13 June 2012 (UTC)
For what it's worth, here are some cites that seem to use "girly girl" to mean "girlygirl", not just "a girl who is girly" - in other words, if you swapped in "boyish boy" for "girly girl", the sentence would no longer seem right. "I'm like 80% boyish boy, 20% not boyish boy" doesn't sound right, and "effeminate boyish boy" is simply an oxymoron, yet "80% girly girl" or "tomboy girly girl" make more sense ("tomboy girly girl" still seems a bit oxymoronic, but less so than if "girly" was just an adjective modifying "girl"). Smurrayinchester (talk) 08:12, 13 June 2012 (UTC)
Actually, if we follow WT:COALMINE, it says (or implies, or presupposes, or something) that "girlygirl" is supposed to be given as an alternative form of "girly girl", rather than vice versa. —RuakhTALK 11:47, 13 June 2012 (UTC)
Yeah, when I was writing that I assumed "girlygirl" was the more common form. Apparently I was wrong, so yes, Keep this entry, replace girlygirl with {{alternative form of|girly girl}}. Smurrayinchester (talk) 20:27, 14 June 2012 (UTC)
That seems reasonable. Ƿidsiþ 11:48, 13 June 2012 (UTC)

Basically, when transcribing speech, I can't tell the difference between the two. Surely that means it falls under COALMINE, and I don't think this is such a harmful entry to have, either. --Μετάknowledgediscuss/deeds 15:36, 13 June 2012 (UTC)

Keep, this is kinda what I envisaged when proposing WT:COALMINE; if girlygirl meets CFI then the more common form should not be deleted merely because it has a space in it. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:49, 14 June 2012 (UTC)
Keep, because of WT:COALMINE, but also on the alternative grounds that it is a set phrase, and that the definitionally equivalent "girlish girl" is not used with equal propensity. bd2412 T 19:07, 15 June 2012 (UTC)

Kept. — TAKASUGI Shinji (talk) 16:27, 15 August 2012 (UTC)