absolution

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English absolucion, absolucioun, from Old French absolution, from Latin absolūtiōnem, accusative singular of absolūtiō (acquittal), from absolvō (absolve). See also absolve.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

absolution (plural absolutions)

  1. (ecclesiastical) An absolving of sins from ecclesiastical penalties by an authority. [First attested around 1150 to 1350.][1]
  2. Forgiveness of sins, in a general sense. [First attested around 1150 to 1350.][1]
  3. The form of words by which a penitent is absolved. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shipley to this entry?)
  4. An absolving, or setting free from guilt, sin, or penalty; forgiveness of an offense. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]
    Government ... granting absolution to the nation.
  5. (civil law, obsolete) An acquittal, or sentence of a judge declaring an accused person innocent. [First attested in the early 17th century.][1]
  6. (obsolete) Delivery, in speech.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 9

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French, from Latin absolūtiōnem, accusative singular of absolūtiō (acquittal), from absolvō (absolve).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

absolution f (plural absolutions)

  1. absolution (from sins or wrongs)
  2. (law) acquittal, absolution

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French absolution, from Latin absolūtiō, absolūtiōnem (acquittal), from absolvō, absolvere (absolve, acquit), from ab (from, away from) + solvō, solvere (release, loosen, dissolve, take apart).

Noun[edit]

absolution f (plural absolutions)

  1. absolution