brise

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See also: Brise and brisé

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

brise

  1. (obsolete, rare) A tract of land that has been left untilled for a long time.
    • 1616: Richard Surflet [tr.] and Gervase Markham [aug.], Estienne and Liébault’s Maison Rustique, or The Countrie Farme, page 92
      Afterward let him draw a Brise or two made fast in the yoke.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German brise (breeze).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /briːsə/, [ˈb̥ʁiːsə]

Noun[edit]

brise c (singular definite brisen, plural indefinite briser)

  1. breeze

Inflection[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brise f (plural brises)

  1. breeze

Verb[edit]

brise

  1. first-person singular present indicative of briser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of briser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of briser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of briser
  5. second-person singular imperative of briser

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

brise

  1. present subjunctive analytic of bris

Usage notes[edit]

Used with a noun or pronoun as the subject.

Noun[edit]

brise f

  1. genitive singular of bris

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
brise bhrise mbrise
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Germanic origin.

Noun[edit]

brise f (plural brises)

  1. breeze