comport

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Old French comporter, from Latin comportare (to bring together), from com- (together) + portare (to carry).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kəmˈpɔː(ɹ)t/

Verb[edit]

comport (third-person singular simple present comports, present participle comporting, simple past and past participle comported)

  1. (obsolete, transitive, intransitive) To tolerate, bear, put up (with). [16th–19th c.]
    to comport with an injury
    • Daniel
      The malecontented sort / That never can the present state comport.
  2. (intransitive) To be in agreement (with); to be of an accord. [from 16th c.]
    The new rules did not seem to comport with the spirit of the club.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      How ill this dullness doth comport with greatness.
    • John Locke
      How their behaviour herein comported with the institution.
  3. (reflexive) To behave (in a given manner). [from 17th c.]
    She comported herself with grace.
    • Burke
      Observe how Lord Somers [] comported himself.

Synonyms[edit]

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the template {{sense|"gloss"}}, substituting a short version of the definition for "gloss".

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

comport

  1. (obsolete) Manner of acting; conduct; deportment.
    I knew them well, and marked their rude comport. — Dryden.

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

comport

  1. first-person singular present tense form of comporta.
  2. first-person singular subjunctive form of comporta.