county

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English[edit]

A map showing counties of the Kingdom of Hungary (Hungary proper, Croatia and Slavonia), 1886-1918

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman counte, Old French conté (French comté), from Latin comitātus (jurisdiction of a count), from comes (count, earl).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

county (plural counties)

  1. (historical) The land ruled by a count or a countess.
  2. An administrative region of various countries, including Bhutan, Canada, China, Croatia, France, Ireland, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Serbia and Montenegro and Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States.
  3. A definitive geographic region, without direct administrative functions.
    traditional county

Usage notes[edit]

  • In American usage, counties are almost always designated as such, with the word "County" capitalized and following the name — e.g., "Lewis County", rarely "Lewis", and never "County Lewis."
  • In British usage, counties are referenced without designation — e.g. "Kent" and never "Kent County". The exception is Durham, which is often "County Durham" (but never "Durham County"). An organisation such as Kent County Council is the "County Council" of "Kent" and not the "Council" of "Kent County".
  • In Irish usage, counties are frequently referenced, but like Durham precede the name — e.g., "County Cork" or "Cork" and never "Cork County."

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

county (comparative more county, superlative most county)

  1. Characteristic of a ‘county family’; representative of the gentry or aristocracy of a county.
    • 1979, John Le Carré, Smiley's People, Folio Society 2010, p. 274:
      She was a tall girl and county, with Hilary's walk: she seemed to topple even when she sat.