dory

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

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Attested in American English of 1709 CE; assumed to be related to Central of Western Indian language, perhaps Miskito.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dory (plural dories)

  1. (nautical) A small flat-bottomed boat used for fishing both offshore and on rivers.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

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An 1831–1841 pencil and watercolor illustration of the John Dory (Zeus faber) by William MacGillivray, from the collection of the Natural History Museum, London

From Old French doree, past participle of dorer (to gild), from Latin deauratus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dory (plural dories)

  1. Any of several different families of large-eyed, silvery, deep-bodied, laterally compressed, and roughly discoid marine fish.
  2. (obscure, cooking) A dish that has been coated or glazed with "almond milk".
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dory (comparative more dory, superlative most dory)

  1. (obscure) Of a bright yellow or golden color.
  2. (obscure, cooking) Coated or glazed with "almond milk".

Etymology 3[edit]

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Two hoplites holding dorys in their right hands. The soldier on the left is using his dory with an underhand thrust, and the other an overhand one.

Borrowing from Ancient Greek δόρυ (dóru).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /dɒrʊ/

Noun[edit]

dory (plural dories)

  1. A wooden pike or spear about three metres (ten feet) in length with a flat, leaf-shaped iron spearhead and a bronze butt-spike (called a sauroter), which was the main weapon of hoplites in Ancient Greece. It was not thrown, but thrust at opponents with one hand.

References[edit]

  • dory” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Anagrams[edit]