fash

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From early modern French fascher (now fâcher), from Latin fastus (disdain).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fash (third-person singular simple present fashes, present participle fashing or fashin, simple past and past participle fashed)

  1. (Scotland, Geordie, Northern England) To worry; to bother, annoy.
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula, Chapter 6:
      "I wouldn't fash masel' about them, miss. Them things be all wore out."

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

fash (plural fashes)

  1. (Scotland, Geordie, Northern England) A worry; trouble; bother.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Whites Latin-English Dictionary: 1899.
  • Consise Oxford: 1984.
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[1]
  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [2]

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From early modern French fascher (now fâcher), from Latin fastus (disdain).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tae fash (third-person singular simple present fashes, present participle fashin, simple past fasht, past participle fasht)

  1. (transitive) To bother, worry, annoy.