flot

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See also: flöt and fløt

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Dutch vloot (fleet).

Noun[edit]

flot

  1. fleet

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French flot (considerable quantity of poured liquid, stream, flow), from Old French flot (mass of moving water, flood, tidal flow), partly from Old Norse flóð (stream, river, flood, massive flow of water); partly from Frankish *flota (flux, streaming flow); and partly from Frankish *flōd (river, flood); all from Proto-Germanic *flōduz (river), Proto-Germanic *flutōną (flow), from Proto-Indo-European *plōw- (to pour, wash). Cognate with Old Dutch fluod (river), Old High German fluot (flood), Old English flōd (river, flood), Gothic 𐍆𐌻𐍉𐌳𐌿𐍃 (flōdus, river, stream). More at fleuve, flood, flow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flot m (plural flots)

  1. (in the plural, literary) waves
  2. stream, flood (large amount)
    J'ai reçu un flot de lettres. — I received a flood of letters.
  3. incoming tide (of the sea); floodtide

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Partly from Old Norse flóð (stream, river, flood, massive flow of water); partly from Frankish *flota (flux, streaming flow); and partly from Frankish *flōd (river, flood); all from Proto-Germanic *flōduz (river), Proto-Germanic *flutōną (flow), from Proto-Indo-European *plōw- (to pour, wash).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

flot m (oblique plural floz or flotz, nominative singular floz or flotz, nominative plural flot)

  1. wave, billow; surge on the surface of a body of water agitated by winds
  2. a large expanse of moving water, flood; river
  3. current, stream

Related terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flot

  1. genitive plural of flota