flod

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Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse flóð, from Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plōtus, from *plō- (flow). Compare Swedish flod, Icelandic flóð, English flood, Dutch vloed, German Flut.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flod c (singular definite floden, plural indefinite floder)

  1. river
  2. (uncountable) high tide

Inflection[edit]


Old English[edit]

The word flōd is found, as flodu, on the early 8th century Franks Casket, one of the oldest monuments of Old English.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plōtus, from *plew- (flow). Cognate with Old Saxon flōd, Old Dutch fluot (Dutch vloed), Old High German fluot (German Flut), Old Norse flóð (Icelandic flóð), Gothic 𐍆𐌻𐍉𐌳𐌿𐍃 (flōdus).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flōd m (nominative plural flōdas)

  1. flowing of the tide
  2. river, stream; water as opposed to land
  3. flood, deluge

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plōtus, from *plō- (flow). Compare Old English flōd, Old Dutch fluot, Old High German fluot, Old Norse flóð, Gothic 𐍆𐌻𐍉𐌳𐌿𐍃 (flōdus).

Noun[edit]

flōd m

  1. river, stream
  2. flood, deluge

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse flóð, from Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plōtus. Compare Danish flod, Icelandic flóð, English flood, Dutch vloed, German Flut.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flod c

  1. a river
  2. a flood
  3. a high tide (opposite of ebb)

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Rivers and streams in Scandinavia are named älv (-älven), å (-ån), ström (e.g. Göta älv, Lule älv, Svartån, Motala ström, Norrström), while flod is used to refer to rivers abroad.

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

river
flood
tide

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flod (plural flods)

  1. frost

Declension[edit]