indolence

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French indolence, from Latin indolentia

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

indolence (plural indolences)

  1. Habitual laziness or sloth.
    • 1814, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, ch. 11:
      "It is indolence, Mr. Bertram, indeed. Indolence and love of ease; a want of all laudable ambition, of taste for good company, or of inclination to take the trouble of being agreeable, which make men clergymen."
    • 1912, Stewart Edward White, The Sign at Six, ch. 19:
      [H]er whole figure expressed a tense vibrant life in singular contrast to the apparent indolence of the men at whom she was talking.
    • 2001 Sept. 10, Garrison Keillor, "In Praise of Lasiness," Time (retrieved 24 March 2014):
      [N]ow, after five weeks of doing nothing, I am an authority on the subject of indolence and glad to share my views with you.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin indolentia.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

indolence f (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) insensibility, lack of pain
  2. laziness, indolence

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