inertia

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Latin inertia (lack of art or skill, inactivity, indolence), from iners (unskilled, inactive), from in- (without, not) + ars (skill, art).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

inertia (countable and uncountable, plural inertias or inertiæ)

  1. (physics, uncountable or countable) The property of a body that resists any change to its uniform motion; equivalent to its mass.
  2. (figuratively) In a person, unwillingness to take action.
    • Carlyle
      Men [] have immense irresolution and inertia.
    • 2014, Jacob Steinberg, "Wigan shock Manchester City in FA Cup again to reach semi-finals", The Guardian, 9 March 2014:
      City had been woeful, their anger at their own inertia summed up when Samir Nasri received a booking for dissent, and they did not have a shot on target until the 66th minute.
  3. (medicine) Lack of activity; sluggishness; said especially of the uterus, when, in labour, its contractions have nearly or wholly ceased.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

External links[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

inertia

  1. inertia

Declension[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From iners (without skill; inactive), from in- (not) + ars (art, skill).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

inertia f (genitive inertiae); first declension

  1. want of art or skill, unskillfulness, ignorance
  2. (by extension) inactivity, idleness, laziness, indolence

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative inertia inertiae
genitive inertiae inertiārum
dative inertiae inertiīs
accusative inertiam inertiās
ablative inertiā inertiīs
vocative inertia inertiae

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • inertia in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879