insensible

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French insensible, from Late Latin insensibilis

Adjective[edit]

insensible (comparative more insensible, superlative most insensible)

  1. Unable to be perceived by the senses.
    • Sir Thomas Browne
      Two small and almost insensible pricks were found upon Cleopatra's arm.
    • Dryden
      They fall away, / And languish with insensible decay.
  2. Incapable or deprived of physical sensation.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 1, The Fate of the Artemis[1]:
      “[…] Captain Markam had been found lying half-insensible, gagged and bound, on the floor of the sitting-room, his hands and feet tightly pinioned, and a woollen comforter wound closely round his mouth and neck ; whilst Mrs. Markham's jewel-case, containing valuable jewellery and the secret plans of Port Arthur, had disappeared. […]”
  3. Unable to be understood; unintelligible.
  4. Not sensible or reasonable; meaningless.
    • Sir M. Hale
      If it make the indictment be insensible or uncertain, it shall be quashed.
  5. Incapable of mental feeling; indifferent.
    • Dryden
      Lost in their loves, insensible of shame.
    • Sir H. Wotton
      Accept an obligation without being a slave to the giver, or insensible to his kindness.
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Modern Library Edition (1995), page 138
      In spite of her deep-rooted dislike, she could not be insensible to the compliment of such a man's affection...
  6. Incapable of emotional feeling; callous; apathetic.

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]



French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

insensible (masculine and feminine, plural insensibles)

  1. insensible
  2. impervious

Spanish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

insensible m, f (plural insensibles)

  1. insensible, insensitive, cold, tactless

Antonyms[edit]