palatine

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See also: Palatine

English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Middle French palatin (palatine), from Old French, from Medieval Latin palatinus (imperial, imperial official), from Latin palatium (palace).

Part of the Imperial Palace complex on the Palatine Hill overlooking the Circus Maximus.

Adjective[edit]

palatine (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to the Palatine Hill in Rome.
  2. Of or relating to powers normally possessed by a sovereign but exercised by a lesser noble, or by a nominee of a sovereign.
  3. Of or relating to a palace, particularly for the Eastern and Western Roman emperors.
  4. Of or relating to a palatine or a palatinate, especially the Rhineland Palatinate.

Noun[edit]

palatine (plural palatines)

  1. A Roman soldier.
  2. A Roman or Byzantine official.
  3. A feudal lord (a count palatine or Pfalzgraf) or a bishop possessing palatine powers.
  4. A resident of a palatinate.
  5. The highest dignitary in the former Kingdom of Hungary after the king.
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Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from French palatin (relating to the palate), from Latin palatum (palate).

Adjective[edit]

palatine (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to the palate
  2. Of or relating to a palatine bone.

Noun[edit]

palatine (plural palatines)

  1. (anatomy) One of a pair of bones behind the palate.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ‘Princess Palatine’ Anne Gonzaga, who popularised the garment.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

palatine f (plural palatines)

  1. (historical) tippet, shoulder cape

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

palatine f pl

  1. feminine plural of palatino

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

palatine

  1. vocative masculine singular of palatinus