pilgrim

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See also: Pilgrim

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English (early 13th century) pilegrim, from Old French pelegrin (11th century), from Latin peregrinus (foreigner) (English peregrine (wandering)), a derivation from per-egre; see per- + agri (field, farm) (from which English agri- (farming)).

The change of -r...r- to -l...r- is an effect of dissimilation in early Romance; compare Italian cognate pellegrino.

Noun[edit]

pilgrim (plural pilgrims)

  1. One who travels, especially on a journey to visit sites of religious significance.
    • Bible, Hebrews xi. 13
      strangers and pilgrims on the earth

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pilgrim (third-person singular simple present pilgrims, present participle pilgriming, simple past and past participle pilgrimed)

  1. (intransitive) To journey; to wander; to ramble.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Grew to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Carlyle to this entry?)

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse pílagrímr (pilgrim), from Medieval Latin pelegrinus, from Latin peregrīnus (foreigner, traveler).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pilɡrɛm/, [ˈpʰilˌɡ̊ʁɛmˀ], [ˈpʰilˌɡ̊ʁɛm] or IPA(key): /piːlɡrɛm/, [ˈpʰiːlˌɡ̊ʁɛmˀ], [ˈpʰiːlˌɡ̊ʁɛm]

Noun[edit]

pilgrim c (singular definite pilgrimmen, plural indefinite pilgrimme)

  1. pilgrim (traveller, especially to religious sites)

Inflection[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pilgrim c

  1. pilgrim

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]