slough

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See also: Slough

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English, akin to Middle High German slûch (slough) (whence German Schlauch (tube, hose)).

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Noun[edit]

slough (plural sloughs)

  1. The skin shed by a snake or other reptile.
    That is the slough of a rattler; we must be careful.
  2. Dead skin on a sore or ulcer.
    This is the slough that came off of his skin after the burn.
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Verb[edit]

slough (third-person singular simple present sloughs, present participle sloughing, simple past and past participle sloughed)

  1. (transitive) To shed (skin).
    This skin is being sloughed.
  2. (intransitive) To slide off (like a layer of skin).
    A week after he was burned, a layer of skin on his arm sloughed off.
    • 2013, Casey Watson, Mummy’s Little Helper: The heartrending true story of a young girl:
      The mud sloughed off her palms easily []
  3. (transitive, card games) To discard.
    East sloughed a heart.
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Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English slōh, probably from Proto-Germanic *slōhaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

slough (plural sloughs)

  1. (UK) A muddy or marshy area.
    • 1883 "That comed - as you call it - of being arrant asses," retorted the doctor, "and not having sense enough to know honest air from poison, and the dry land from a vile, pestiferous slough. — Treasure Island, Robert Louis Stevenson
  2. (Eastern United States) A type of swamp or shallow lake system, typically formed as or by the backwater of a larger waterway, similar to a bayou with trees.
    We paddled under a canopy of trees through the slough.
  3. (Western United States) A secondary channel of a river delta, usually flushed by the tide.
    The Sacramento River Delta contains dozens of sloughs that are often used for water-skiing and fishing.
  4. A state of depression.
    John is in a slough.
  5. (Canadian Prairies) A small pond, often alkaline, many but not all are formed by glacial potholes.
    Potholes or sloughs formed by a glacier’s retreat from the central plains of North America, are now known to be some of the world’s most productive ecosystems.
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